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Hello! I am a writer, teacher, and scholar. This is my website.

About


Christopher Lirette is a writer and scholar living in Atlanta, Georgia. His doctoral research focuses on the personal, historical, political, and lyric aspects of the decline of the Louisiana shrimp fishery in a world of global capital and communication.

His research interests include

  • labor and deindustrialization as they relate to cultural expression, identity, ethnicity, creolization, locality, temporality, imagination, belonging, and public policy
  • southern Louisiana and its historical imaginaries
  • American culture, politics, and history
  • experimental and visual scholarship, especially documentary filmmaking and humanities computing
  • popular culture, especially visual representations of place and the politics of location shooting
  • interdisciplinarity

Curriculum Vitae

Teaching


I teach American Studies classes at Emory University. I used to teach creative and expository writing at Cornell University.

Here are some courses I’ve designed and taught.

Image


Some videos I filmed, produced, and edited.

Some photographs from my fieldwork.

 

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  • Boat in DulacCivilizations without Boats Prospectus
    A Heterogeography of Chauvin, Louisiana what These are the facts of Chauvin, Louisiana: a small, coastal town, populated by refugees from the Acadian diaspora; a place where men are trawlers, roustabouts, and roughnecks, and the women wives, cashiers; a hurricane disaster plain; shore-zero for oil spills; a French community that morphed into an illiterate American one; a repository for the old songs, two-steps, and trickster tales from a beautiful, impossible past; a population uneducated on behalf of the state, a still-spooky Catholicism, and technological maladjustment. And yet, facts are not enough. This research projects intends to map the spaces between those “facts,” the impossible places, the intensities felt behind the hard stones of culture, the worlds that are verging on becoming. I want to study how people make worlds out of the stories and landscapes they live in. I want to understand how these worlds harden into story and culture and land, how they become facts. I want to understand the worlds that die and the ones that are eroded by the strong worlds already extant. To do this, I will go to Chauvin and talk to the people that live there, make movies with them, look through their stuff, and share in their imaginings. My questions will be: How do you imagine your past? What could the future hold for you, your town, your landscapes? How do you move through the world in the present and what stories and fantasies propel you? But questions, like facts, are not enough. To cull the ephemeral space between actualities […]
  • Jean Grey HeaderGospel of Jean Grey: Pulls out a God
    Here is another of a series of poems titled “The Gospel of Jean Grey,” all shot at MINT Gallery in Atlanta, where I had a reading October 27, 2013. […]
  • surgical theater headertowards an ethnography of the dead
    tracing the ghost in Michel Foucault’s autoportrait as surprised anatomist In an interview with Claude Bonnefoy in 1968, Michel Foucault reimagines his project of writing as one that slices into the dead body of other people.1 Only the corpses are not dead, and it is unclear who those people were. He says, “For me the sheet of paper may be the body of the other” (39). He says, “For me, writing means having to deal with the death of others, but it basically means having to deal with others to the extent that they’re already dead. In one sense, I’m speaking over the corpse of others” (40). The metaphor resonates with some autobiographical details Foucault divulges: his father, a surgeon, does not act through speech, but through an act of dissection, to “reach the silent truth of the body” (35); the son, a writer, acts only through a way of speaking which becomes also an act of dissection, but one undertaken only for a post-mortem diagnosis, a ferreting out a kernel of truth that finally became fatal. Speaking over could also mean that he speaks the loudest in a chorus of the dead. This meaning becomes a stranger fantasy than one of the self-deprecating philosopher, assuming a creepy naïveté. Foucault continues his autoportrait, “I don’t condemn them to death. I simply assume they’re already dead. That’s why I’m so surprised when I hear them cry out” (41). These three sentences would be an excellent epigraph for a horror-adventure novel—words of a villain, an accidental necromancer, a mad scientist. The “they” could be […]
  • marty j headerCivilizations without Boats
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  • Temptation of St. Anthony Bosch Detaillet’s whisper our diagnoses and start a science
    a close reading of a nearly mystical passage at the end of History of Madness Man and madmen are perhaps more closely linked in the modern world than they could ever have been in the powerful animal metamorphoses illuminated by the burning mills of Bosch: they are joined by the impalpable link of a reciprocal and incompatible truth; they murmur to each other this truth of their essence, which evaporates from having been said by one to the other. Each light is extinguished by the light that it has brought into being, and is thereby returned to the light that it tore, yet which had summoned it, and which it had so cruelly exposed. Today, the only truth that men possess is the enigma of the mad that they both are and are not; each madman both does and does not carry within him this truth about man, which he bares in the fall of his humanity.1 L’homme et le fou sont liés dans le monde moderne plus solidement peut-être qui’ils n’avaient pu l’être dans les puissantes métamorphoses animales qu’éclairaient jadis les moulins incendiés de Bosch : ils sont liés par ce lien impalpable d’une vérité réciproque et incompatible; ils se disent l’un à l’autre cette vérité de leur essence qui disparaît d’avoir été dite à l’un par l’autre. Chaque lumière s’éteint du jour qu’elle a fait naître et se trouve par là rendue à cette nuit qu’elle déchirait, qui l’avait appelée pourtant, et que, si cruellement, elle manifestait. L’homme, de nos jours, n’a de vérité que dans l’énigme du fou qu’il est et n’est pas; chaque fou porte et ne porte pas en […]